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COMMENTS ON A SPIRITUALIST MEETING
19th  April 1993

"BEWARE the fool's advice" was a good and worthy proverb. A fool's wisdom perchance, is certain, certain to be neither intended or directed. The soothsaying stars, and the cards and projections of the adept, were never random, but rather as precise as they could be. One must never place another man's intuition before one's own in matters that concern you and not he. Well meant or not, even the 'guidance' of a select few who have departed, may not be worthy of unquestioned consideration.

It is good for men and women to be reminded that they are loved, and in truth coddled in such loving emanations as do stream in upon them as fine as gossamer, as iridescent as phosphorous. And too, that they are encouraged to be mindful of our relative invisible regions, and our true spiritual home, on which the very foundations of this world rest totally.

Dear and sweet comforters, who seek to attend to both the living and the departed, in truth, "they know not what they say"; and oft times, neither do we!

There is an attraction, a fascination, every man experiences when fortunes are cast before them and speculated upon. Generally speaking, if the advice is wholesome and applicable to all men, then it may advance beyond the fanciful; it may, if heeded, be useful.

Regardless, one must question the authority of which, portends disclosure of personal detail. The entire question of predestination has been laid bare also. It can be said that in some regards a man bears witness to himself. That concealed immediately within his aura are evidences of motivations and recollections and offspring of thought. His passions and their persuasions, his visions too, that he himself has projected there in safekeeping for realization in the future. A man is very complex indeed, and it would be no easy task to try to 'read him like a book'.
 One can interpret his immediate thoughts and surrounding influences of the day, of the week, far easier, however a medium has not the discernment to know exactly from where the impressions are coming from.
For example: it may be that a man is troubled, and this is apparent. The overwhelming picture before the clairvoyant is one of a bucket and a rope formed as a hangman's noose. The second impression is that of a recent burial and all of the trappings that go with the event. The third impression maybe misery - intensely experienced by the sympathetic medium. One might feel justified in presuming that the man before them is on the brink of suicide, even though he may be a farmer by trade and the bucket and noose are merely for a cattleman's purpose. You see, one may 'pluck' misery from almost anywhere, particularly at gatherings of the disgruntled deceased who suffer unhappy and shocking remains, both in the memory of the living and in the subtle counterparts still unresolved, and undissolved. As for the impression of the burial, it could of course, given the circumstances, have come from anywhere.

Furthermore, there are combinations of impressions when one comes to draw from a whole room of people. There may be glaring points, which as a beacon, call out from a man most obviously; but it will not be apparent to a medium as to exactly why. He can only 'go further' with the assistance from the individual being scrutinized.

At best, a man may take opportunity to have revealed consciously to himself some of those outstanding impressions which are burdensome to him and make address of such with the object to change, heal or disband. At worst, a man who is in the constant practise of consulting a seer, may become open to suggestions of himself which come from anyone or anywhere. So much so, that by relaxing into this condition of openness, the individual is susceptible to others' impressions of him whether they are grounded in reality of fact or not. He will be quick to hear the criticisms and praise from butcher to baker; and practised also, in dismissing the lot.
 The soul knows when the personality is being deceitful, and no less in the contemplation of self, incorrect and off-centre. If anything, there becomes a true conflict from the disparities; and all men are as uncomfortable with false praise as much as unwarranted ridicule. Many trust to another momentarily, but have decided necessarily at the outset to discard any suggestions which are oblique.

Who are the spirit-guides from whom much testimony and wisdom is imparted?

There can be exceptions to this, but in comment to the experience yesterday, the Red Indian guide was not as an Red Indian man, but an Indian Deva personified with the impression of his dearly departed men friends. You see, many of the more advanced and adequate devas have had long and remarkable bonds with favoured communities, particularly those racial communities which were sympathetic to their existence and perceptive to their spiritual world. This is why there are innumerable spirits of Red Indians presenting in preference to others (which will remain unnamed). Much of the influence and even love from a people, enriched the ego-less deva and enveloped them with a synthesis of personality. For at will they may pick-up much of what a man has left behind, particularly when there was a living link between the two: a relationship of which the two have mingled experiences and impressions of each other, whereupon the soul of the deceased Indian has furthered itself and long departed the immediate boundaries of worldly life, whilst his faithful friend: his deva-companion, re-asserts his memory by becoming a representation (living representation) of what the two combined meant to each other during the time of the Indian's life on Earth.
 Many of those characteristics that were honestly of the Indian are perpetuated and revivified by a deva who craves to be closer to this world and communicate as he once used to do. The mediums become a perfect vehicle for intermediary communication, as they genuinely perceive their guides to be living tangibly, as if they were the man himself. Many of the masquerading devas lose ability to make distinctions themselves and deceive quite innocently, as for all intents and purposes they have memories etc. of all that they speak of.

The genre of the monologue yesterday was harmonious with a gentle and compassionate soul/entity. There was no malice, no corruption, but rather a simple message for simple men eager to be connected to spiritual worlds and spirit-thought. Oddly enough, so many of the humble folk in such gatherings are of course themselves, directly with experience to which the speaking deva is drawn. There may be far more Red Indian within their bones of recollection and experience than in the guest speaker's persona-invisible.

The 'spirit' guides have been great and helpful servants to men. Generally, if amiable, they hold a great respect and love for men, in accordance with the love echoed in all phases of spiritual influence. They are, or try to be, obedient to their men-friends, and have long provided a link into realms which are impassable for worldly senses to penetrate.
 Just as the medium concerned is trusting and open to the companionship of his guide, equally the deva is trusting and open to him. This forms a peculiar resonance between man/soul and etheric/element. The adopted guide becomes sympathetic and protective of their medium, working proudly alongside their friend in an effort to make communication. Because they are enabled an audience they are grateful to the man or woman who mediates their cause.
 It works very well in an otherwise perilous practice, that a medium should enter into a relationship with a reliable and good natured deva-guide. Ultimately it is the overall protection to humble men, who are unaware of the more undesirable entities who queue to take hold of their vulnerable bodies. Even so, there are many, many nervous system disorders associated with such clairvoyance - even with the marriage of guide to medium.
 Historically there has always been an intimate connection between the deva-kingdom and Man. Although there is something of a small revival, the period passed of the last five hundred years or so, has shown less and less of an acknowledgment and an asking for assistance through their being in any way, shape or form. Depending much on country, there are marked degrees of the hardening of men's minds and the subsequent 'slaying of the fairies'.

Quite often more worthier devas are overpowered by the wills of men who are not fit to bid - being corrupt in nature, malcontent in the world. The innocent devas are repelled, whilst the 'street-wise' mischievous may be coerced into unseemly, unruly behavior and attracted by the very forcefulness of a malevolent magician.

Added to this there are hosts of lesser elementals subconscious in the world, who gravitate to the order of higher compelling individualities. Which may be a dandelion, sugar in a sugar-bowl, or a man himself. They may be more or less defined in appearance. Depending upon their personal race, dating back before time - that which was allotted them - they hold various qualities and wisdoms, experience and expertise. They hold the abilities to converse with higher beings and travel into places of the world in which Man is prohibited.

Men appear clumsy and inadequate to those who are advanced, but they bear patience in this, for there are qualities in Man which befuddle them greatly, one being his power and domination over them and their world.
 There is much heartache within the deva-kingdom as the woes of Men reflect upon the spiritual worlds, rendering paradise as shabby and colourless in pockets of great sadnesses. So they know of responsibility to Man, in effort to uplift his condition and see him through to a further threshold, for if he is to regain true paradise the coincidental world of the devas is released into certain evolution by their merit of withstanding.
 They are guardians attending both element and plant, servants to Man, children of Angels. They are attached to a mutual reality - to them, our world being as darkness in light. The radiance of men, when encountered, becomes awesome and overwhelming to them. And the conduct of men marks them irrevocably.